GEN-MEDIEVAL-L Archives

Archiver > GEN-MEDIEVAL > 2000-05 > 0959315074


From: <>
Subject: Re: Maud de St Hilaire, wife of Roger de Clare Earl of Hertford
Date: Fri, 26 May 2000 04:24:34 GMT


In article <>,
John Steele Gordon <> wrote:
> Colin Bevan wrote:
>
> > As this list seems very quiet at the moment, I thought I would
inject some human interest from the following. A few of us will have
this lady as an ancestor.
> >
> > [Robertson. Materials for the history of Thomas Becket, 7 vols,
Rolls Series, London 1875-85, II p255-7; in Latin.]
> > A second miracle performed on James de Clare, son of Roger Earl of
Hertford and Matilda of St Hilary.
> > Some weeks after his recovery, namely in the middle of the
following Lent, James was seized by another sickness and breathed his
last. His mother had set out to church to attend divine service;
members of the household had remained at home. There was no one found
to announce the the death of the boy to the mother, lest he should be
said to have been the cause of the calamity. At length a little boy,
the brother of the dead infant, ran to the church (it is known for a
fact that no boy keeps a secret) and exclaimed over and over again to
his mother, "Madam, my brother is dead. Madam, my brother is dead."
>
> [snip]
>
> A latter-day miracle (or horror story--take your choice):
>
> According to Helen Ridgely's Historic Graves of Maryland and the
> District of Columbia (1908), in the early 18th century, the wife of
the
> Reverend Daniel Maynadier of Talbot County, Maryland, died and was
> quickly buried. But because she was buried with a valuable ring on her
> finger, a grave robber that night unearthed her and attempted to
removed
> the ring. Unable to do so, he attempted to chop off her finger and
> obtain the ring that way. But when he hacked at her finger, the corpse
> began to groan and stir. Not surprisingly, the thief ran off into the
> night. Meanwhile Mrs. Maynadier staggered out of her grave and made
her
> way to her front door.

[snip]


Yes, I've read that it was not uncommon to bury people with a bell
attached to a string in case they'd not really died, hence the
expression, "Saved by the bell."

:-) Roger


Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.

This thread: