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Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2003-11 > 1069369635


From:
Subject: Re: [DNA] Marker DYS390 in World database+radiation
Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2003 18:07:24 -0500 (EST)
References: <4F35F8BC.6A01AD2D.006EF0D8@aol.com> <REME20031120165805@alum.mit.edu> <00d901c3afb4$822a4c10$3bc3490c@HOME>
In-Reply-To: <00d901c3afb4$822a4c10$3bc3490c@HOME> (sunimaze@att.net)


Kay wrote:
> In a case such as this, would the brother's DNA be most effected or
> would his son's (conceived after the radiation treatment) possibly
> show mutations in their DNA because of their father's radiation?
> Would it ever be possible to set a time for a DNA changing event
> based on descents of sons born before and sons born after the
> "event"?

Medical facilities really do try to minimize exposure to radiation of
parts of the body not needing treatment, especially the gonads.
Indeed, if the whole body were seriously irradiated (such as in a
nuclear accident at a power plant), the person would become very
obviously sick because of the damaged and dying cells. People living
through such accidents would certainly suffer some genetic damage, but
it's not clear whether radiation has any effect on replication
slippage (the type of mutation we see in genealogical Y DNA testing).

John Chandler


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