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Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2003-11 > 1069522959


From: "Raymond" <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] Commercial Venture Aspect of DNA Testing Not The Issue
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 09:42:39 -0800
References: <5.0.2.1.2.20031122082006.04782650@mindspring.com>


It may be worth while to point out that a great deal of work in this area
was and is being carried out by the Mormon Church, who apparently doesn't
think that it is inherently evil. I recently posted this information on my
Rootsweb surname webpage and the link to the Mormon Church's (through BYU
and Sorensen). The message header was "The Mormon Church........."

the body of the message was:

...were pioneers in genetic DNA research at Brigham Young University.

http://molecular-genealogy.byu.edu/

They are working on building a database of 100,000 contributors. The only
problem is that you must document all members in four generations of
ancestors and you don't get any results back from them. Apparently they
don't consider this work as ungodly and heathen, in fact they are the ones
who started it all.

The Coon Surname DNA project is located at:

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~coondnapage/

We would like to have 100,000 participants too, but have only six at this
time. Something in between would work nicely. :-)

Here you will get your results and be able to compare with others in the
database.

When the last male in a genealogical line is gone then this opportunity will
die with him." END

I has questions for a few people and one of them joined and another seems to
be still considering it.

I wouldn't rely on "normal intelligence" or any kind of intelligence when
addressing people's fears. The appeal to authority, especially if the
authority is well respected in the genealogical community may help.

Raymond Coon
Oregon



> Greetings Peter,
>
> Unfortunately, the "commercial venture" aspect, that is sometimes
expressed
> by people regarding a Surname DNA Project, really has nothing to do with
> that issue at all. If so it would be relatively easy to explain that to a
> normally intelligent person.
>



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