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Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2004-08 > 1092251270


From: "Ken Nordtvedt" <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] Celts in Central Europe
Date: Wed, 11 Aug 2004 13:07:50 -0600
References: <BD3FB390.B2B3%starry@hhadvertising.com> <001901c47fc7$67bfd0a0$4ce289d1@Ken1> <00db01c47fd8$be6b8f00$22448251@d6e4z6>


I think R1b is somewhat more general than "Celtic". For instance, there is
a solid foundation of R1b in Germany, albeit reduced in percent from its
very high levels in France and Iberia and B.C. British Isles. R1b also got
to Netherlands, Norway, Denmark and Sweden (but not Finland) in substantial
amount But what has hit me as a stronger coincidence or otherwise between
genes and language, is that I1a's domain of 30-something percent presence so
well matches the areas of Germanic-speaking peoples --- Germans, Dutch,
Scandinavians. My prejudice is that R1b came first and spread over all
habitable territories, but then I1a came later and spread to only selected
areas in large amounts. What did the I1a peoples bring with themselves
other than the Gravettian culture which many have speculated about?

Ken


----- Original Message -----
From: "FosGroup" <>
To: <>
Sent: Wednesday, August 11, 2004 1:23 PM
Subject: Re: [DNA] Celts in Central Europe


> Ken/Shane/List
> 1. Does anyone have a view on the linguistical similarities connecting
> Iberia (Portugal/Spain); Hibernia (The ancient name for Ireland), and
> Siberia (North Eastern Russia) ?
>
> 2. Anyone interpreting J D McDonald's map: "Y Haplogroups of Europe ", and
> having a background knowledge of the Celtic homelands in Classical and
> Modern times, surely has to arrive at a conclusion that there is a strong
> correspondence between being Celtic and being R1b, and probably that Celt
=
> R1b !, without all R1b's necessarily speaking a Celtic language.
>
> 3.The Anglo-Saxons and Danes spoke only a version of North German, and yet
> Ken has recently shown that in addition to being a mixture of "I" and
"R1a"
> clades, the North Sea invaders of Britain also contained a subclade
variant
> of the R1b AMH.
>
> 4. If the ASaxons and Danish Vikings were partially variant AMHs, then
> presumably they could also have contained most other R1b haplotypes.
>
> Alan Foster.
> ========
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Ken Nordtvedt" <>
> To: <>
> Sent: Wednesday, August 11, 2004 6:11 PM
> Subject: Re: [DNA] Celts in Central Europe
>
>
> > Shane,
> >
> > That's why I said "Germanic-speaking" and "Celtic-speaking". I think
the
> > European tribes were segregated by the languages they spoke. Or do you
> > think Central Europe was a checker board patterns of Celtic-speaking and
> > Germanic-speaking tribes?
> >
> > Ken
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: "Shane" <>
> > To: <>
> > Sent: Wednesday, August 11, 2004 10:29 AM
> > Subject: Re: [DNA] Celts in Central Europe
> >
> >
> > > > Where were the Germanic-speaking tribes living when the Celtic
> speakers
> > > > dominated Central Europe?
> > > >
> > > > Ken
> > > >
>
>
> ==============================
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>



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