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Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2006-04 > 1145906740


From: (John Chandler)
Subject: Re: [DNA] irish origins and myths
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 2006 15:25:40 -0400 (EDT)
References: <20060424143129.61809.qmail@web52115.mail.yahoo.com>
In-Reply-To: <20060424143129.61809.qmail@web52115.mail.yahoo.com> (messagefrom ellen Levy on Mon, 24 Apr 2006 07:31:29 -0700 (PDT))


Ellen wrote:
> All the factors you discribed = high frequency of
> certain haplogroups, haplotypes, and blood groups -
> can be highly effected by drift, natural selection and
> endogamy.

That's not the whole picture, by any means. You left out the
important part, which is the fact that the genetic oddities
are at the centers of broad geographic *trends*. Of the
factors you cite, only natural selection could possibly
give this pattern, and I would really like to hear the basis
for your belief that the dominace of R1b is due to natural
selection.

> the mtDNA genetic evidence from the ancient and modern
> Basque populations makes it very clear...

You're getting circular here. I have criticized the tests
of ancient DNA, and you're citing them to defend themselves.

> All the ancient Basque studies deal with this
> authentication issue because it is a big concern with
> aDNA studies.

I am suggesting that it's a bigger concern and that the authentication
efforts, however thorough, dealt only with a subset of the possible
problems. As you pointed out, these studies all seem to show that
there is no continuity anywhere. Maybe that's telling us something
about fossil DNA rather than about populations.

John Chandler


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