GENEALOGY-DNA-L Archives

Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2006-09 > 1159234203


From: "Lawrence Mayka" <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] Celts descended from Spanish fishermen, study finds
Date: Mon, 25 Sep 2006 20:30:03 -0500
In-Reply-To: <001101c6e108$16be8350$6400a8c0@Ken1>


> From:
> [mailto:] On Behalf Of Ken Nordtvedt
> Sent: Monday, September 25, 2006 8:07 PM
> There were people living all
> around the east end of the "East Sea" as I have seen it
> called on some maps
> before the IndoEuropean speakers arrived. They were not all
> Finns.

No, but they were Finnic, or Baltic-Finnic if you prefer. Again, this is
primarily a linguistic term, referring to the (Baltic-)Finnic language
family:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Finnic_peoples

> There is a clear bifurcation in N3 at the Estonian/Latvian border,
> with the folks
> south of that line and even stretching back along the north
> shore of Poland
> having a variety of N3 which is different than that of the
> Estonians, Finns,
> Saami. If databases treated that part of Europe better,
> maybe a sense for
> how old the split is between the two branches of European N3
> could be made.

Yes, I have read that the migration to the Baltic Sea (from the original,
more easterly home of the Baltic-Finnic peoples) was separate from the
migration to Finland.

>My point is just that there was a genetically
> identifiable people there (Baltic people) before the arrival
> of R1a and the
> IndoEuropean languages (which may or may not have arrived
> together) and I
> suspect these people were heavily N3-southern variety

I agree.


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