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Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2006-09 > 1159343501


From: John Cartmell <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] Roman genetic footprints
Date: Wed, 27 Sep 2006 08:51:41 +0100
References: <e468a0040609231040k5d04a5b2q9de7629a7ce876eb@mail.gmail.com><00f901c6e043$aae5b7d0$6401a8c0@Precision360><e468a0040609242001j50d821d4k7813a77acc87a4a8@mail.gmail.com><4e6bce2614john@cartmell.demon.co.uk><e468a0040609261147o2e4b7d6dvb737a052a8e6c9e7@mail.gmail.com>
In-Reply-To: <e468a0040609261147o2e4b7d6dvb737a052a8e6c9e7@mail.gmail.com>


On 26 Sep, A DesCartes <> wrote:
> Whether you are positing on the the `R`, `I`, `J`, `E`, or `G` HG`s that
> predominate in Europe,... your `positing` will find its start somewhere in
> the Black Sea region.

And it seems obvious to me why this should be the case - though the books that
I've encountered seem to be intent on ignoring it. When, from over 10,000
years ago there was a fresh-water lake in the centre of a fertile depression,
the place was a magnet for everyone wanting to try out this new agriculture
thing - and people would stumble across it from the near east, India, north
Asia and Europe. Then, when the Black Sea filled in all those people would be
forced out, beyond already settled areas around the new Sea. And spreading
their diversity of genes.

And yet all those books with maps of 10k, 25k and more years ago show the
Black Sea coast as it is today with arrows showing people skirting the place
and squeezing through the highland areas between the Black Sea and the Caspian
Sea.

--
John Cartmelljohn@ followed by finnybank.com 0845 006 8822
Qercus magazineFAX +44 (0)8700-519-527www.finnybank.com
Qercus - the best guide to RISC OS computing



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