GENEALOGY-DNA-L Archives

Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2006-12 > 1166318450


From: "Sasson Margaliot" <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] Aryan, Arian, Arianism....
Date: Sun, 17 Dec 2006 03:20:50 +0200
References: <3b2a446a0612161244k2f075afbhfadd0d7532406fcb@mail.gmail.com><949573.55223.qm@web52106.mail.yahoo.com>
In-Reply-To: <949573.55223.qm@web52106.mail.yahoo.com>


On 12/17/06, ellen Levy <> wrote:

> Sasson:
>
> I'm referring to an earlier email to the list in which
> your were discussing the "concept" of Aryan racial
> supremacy.

I did not use the word "CONCEPT" reffering to "supremacy", only to the
linguistic and scientific theories.


> You weren't talking about 19th century linguistics

I was specifically talking about the mainstream science in 19th and
early 20th century.

> "As more genetic, historic and linguistic evidence is
> accumulated, we know that the concept is wrong. But
> hundred years ago, it was a hypothetical possibility
> that scientists were considering, and it turned out to
> be wrong."

I said HUNDRED YEARS AGO - it makes it 1906.

This is how the term "Aryan Race" is described in "Encylopaedia Britannica"
in article about English Language: of 1911:

"Of the original home of the so-called primitive Aryan race,
whose language was the parent Indo-European, nothing is certainly known,
though the subject has called forth many conjectures;
the present tendency is to seek it in Europe itself."

English scientists did not know that such "race" or "tribe" did not
exist, or what is going to happen 30 years later.

Another quotation from Britannica 1911:

"The tribe can hardly have occupied an extensive area at first,
but its language came by degrees to be diffused over the greater part of Europe
and some portion of Asia. Among those whose Aryan descent is generally
recognized as beyond dispute are the Teutons, to whom the Angles and
Saxons belonged. "

The concept of "Aryan race", as mentioned in the Encylopedia of 1911,
was the scientific "current thinking" of that time.


Sasson Margaliot





> So what would even be your point of indicating
> "similarities" between German and Indo-Aryan
> languages? What are those similarities, Sasson, and
> what is the relevance to the discussion?


This thread: