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Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2007-11 > 1195302816


From: "Lawrence Mayka" <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] Checking on how to submit FTDNA results to Genbank?
Date: Sat, 17 Nov 2007 06:33:36 -0600
In-Reply-To: <0c5101c828e0$4e9ebb70$640fa8c0@Villandra2>


> [mailto:] On Behalf Of Dora Smith
> Sent: Saturday, November 17, 2007 12:09 AM
> I did not ask about easy upload tools
> to Genbank, nor
> mention such an idea.

Neither did Ms. McDonald mention a tool; she mentioned a "service," such as
Ms. Jonas provides. Frankly, I think you're reading way too much into Ms.
McDonald's simple statement that FTDNA does not currently offer or recommend
a service for individual Genbank submissions.

> It's good science to do so, and
> bad science not
> to. They claim to be actively involved in research on mtdna full
> sequences - or are they really just interested in building
> their own private
> database, and not following established scientific procedure,
> which is to
> submit sequences done for research to Genbank?

Actually, many academics apparently disagree with you. As we have already
found out, many academics ostentatiously ignore the FTDNA and Argus
submissions to Genbank, on the grounds that they are not the result of a
reviewed and published paper. To an academic, our private Genbank
submissions are "bad science" and are most definitely _not_ "established
scientific procedure."

FTDNA's plan, I suspect, is to eventually publish just such a paper, based
on its mtDNA sequences, and then to submit those sequences to Genbank, thus
satisfying even the fussiest academic.

> Finally, if FTDNA wants nothing whatever to do with customers
> submitting
> their results to Genbank, how does Mr. Greenspan always end
> up as identified
> as the submitter (sometimes together with the name of the
> customer who was
> tested), on the Genbank entry?

Many a customer quite sensibly does not want to tag his full mtDNA sequence
publicly with his own name, for fear of the impact on health insurance, etc.
Mr. Greenspan has graciously agreed to act as an intermediary in order to
maintain customers' privacy.



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