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Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2008-06 > 1212615641


From: Thomas Gull <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] Iberian S116+
Date: Wed, 4 Jun 2008 17:40:41 -0400
References: <319683.77523.qm@web86608.mail.ird.yahoo.com><9AD98C94-DB62-4CAD-8BE5-F5F57CBFF047@vizachero.com> <009101c8c686$f2b2f1b0$0100a8c0@john>
In-Reply-To: <009101c8c686$f2b2f1b0$0100a8c0@john>


We have a limited example of this in the New England landing of the Mayflower passengers. The tribes who inhabited the Cape Cod / Plymouth area contracted some European-carried disease a few years before 1620, probably smallpox. There were trading contacts and fishing going on along that coast - the Mayflower was not the first ship to pass that way. In any case, a sizable portion of the population in that local area had died prior to the arrival of the Pilgrims and this is part of what helped the Europeans get a foothold and survive where they might not have been able to do so in a fully-populated area. So, could it be - yes.

Did it happen in Europe - unknown, except we again have obvious events like the plagues of the 1300s through 1600s and the tens of millions of people those killed. So extrapolating that similar events with much smaller populations could really create their own reality is maybe not such a great leap to make. / Tom> From: > To: > Date: Thu, 5 Jun 2008 09:07:03 +1200> Subject: Re: [DNA] Iberian S116+> > Could it be that a new population in an area simply brought along small pox> or measles or some such thing which might wipe out an earlier population> with no immunity to the last man? > > John.> > -----Original Message-----> From: > [mailto:] On Behalf Of Vincent Vizachero> Sent: Thursday, June 05, 2008 1:40 AM> To: Alan R; > Subject: Re: [DNA] Iberian S116+> > > On Jun 4, 2008, at 7:52 AM, Alan R wrote:> > > Cant think of a major extinction event that would have led to > > opportunities for lucky lines to grow OR evidence of the spread and > > subsequent dramatic growth of such a lucky line from a common > > ancestor across western Europe in the identified period.> > There is no reason that you should necessarily be able to think of > such an "extinction event". There probably wasn't one. Population > bottlenecks are one way to get lineage extinctions but they are by no > means required. Lineages go extinct all the time, with not so much > as a whimper to mark their passing.> > VV> > -------------------------------> To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to> with the word 'unsubscribe' without the> quotes in the subject and the body of the message> > No virus found in this incoming message.> Checked by AVG. > Version: 7.5.524 / Virus Database: 269.24.4/1478 - Release Date: 6/2/2008> 7:12 AM> > > No virus found in this outgoing message.> Checked by AVG. > Version: 7.5.524 / Virus Database: 269.24.4/1478 - Release Date: 6/2/2008> 7:12 AM> > > > -------------------------------> To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to with the word 'unsubscribe' without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message


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