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Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2008-09 > 1222149564


From: "David Faux" <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] D9S1120/D9S919 Autosomal marker and Melungeon ancestry
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2008 22:59:24 -0700
References: <ea3bd9560809222031i5e5b99b1w812c644545a4cf4d@mail.gmail.com>
In-Reply-To: <ea3bd9560809222031i5e5b99b1w812c644545a4cf4d@mail.gmail.com>


Drat, I need to reread my posts more thoroughly. I should have noted that
there are now two of us with the 19/20 variant, the other one being myself.
The only documented ancestry I have is European and Six Nations Mohawk. The
variant has not yet been found in any European group (at least in the
academic literature), but in 6 or so North American Native tribes.

David K. Faux.


On 9/22/08, David Faux <> wrote:
>
> List:
>
> I made a number of posts recently about the Schroeder et al. (2007) article
> illustrating the link between Native American populations and the 9 repeat
> variant (9RA) for D9S1120/D9S919 on chromosome 9.
>
>
>
> http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/GENEALOGY-DNA/2008-09/1220685800
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>
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> http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/GENEALOGY-DNA/2008-09/1220719462
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> http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/GENEALOGY-DNA/2008-09/1220842940
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> http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/GENEALOGY-DNA/2008-09/1221440036
>
> I noted that it is possible that the 19/20 repeat variant also has
> geographical structure, constructong a google map to show the specifics.
> Also I refered interested individuals to a study by Hellenthal et al. (2008)
> that might support the premise that this variantion could have emerged in
> the foothills of the Himalayas and moved in a straight line across northern
> East Asia to the territory of the Yakuts and across Beringia. I have
> approached the author of the 2007 paper about this observation and the link
> to Native North American groups. She will be publishing another paper very
> soon which should shed further light on the matter.
>
> To date the only person who has reported having a 19/20 repeat score has
> identified a Melungeon ancestry from VA and TN (e.g., surnames Collins,
> Gibson). It is possible that through genetic drift that this variant is
> found at a relatively high frequency in the mixed ancestry groups of the
> Eastern Seaboard and Appalachians. Hopefully people of this ancestry will
> be willing to invest the small fee via FTDNA in order to obtain results for
> this autosomal marker. Hopefully anyone of possible Native American
> ancestry will consider the investment to determine whether there is a 19/20
> repeat allele, or 9/10 which at this point do not seem to be found in those
> with both parents of European ancestry - but as of this writing that is far
> from sure.
>
> Once FTDNA is back to their normal routines I can request whether they have
> data on the percentage of each allele variant for this marker - and any
> associated geographical info.
>
> David K. Faux.
>


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