GENEALOGY-DNA-L Archives

Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2009-12 > 1260726282


From: Al Aburto <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] R-U152 and R-L21 on the European Continent
Date: Sun, 13 Dec 2009 09:45:17 -0800
References: <200912130459.nBD4x1an022057@mail.rootsweb.com>
In-Reply-To: <200912130459.nBD4x1an022057@mail.rootsweb.com>


Hi Tim,
So for the "right mix" ("sweet spot") we throw away the "43 non-slowest"
mutating markers, giving more sensible TMRCA results. This means the
Y-chromosome, as a whole, having some sort of average mutation rate, is
better represented by these 24 slowest mutating markers. I think I
asked this before, but is your average mutation rate for these 24
slowest markers similar to what Zhivotovsky et al (2004) use?
Al

> Tim Janzen wrote:
> Dear Al,
> Using the 24 slowest mutating markers in the 67-marker haplotypes
> (or some group very similar to this) may well be the "sweet spot" in terms
> of a group of markers that produce TMRCA estimates that are the most likely
> to be close to the true TMRCAs. The estimates I have generated using that
> group of markers has for the most part produced "reasonable" estimates since
> I began testing that set of markers this summer.
> Sincerely,
> Tim
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From:
> [mailto:] On Behalf Of Al Aburto
> Sent: Saturday, December 12, 2009 8:53 PM
> To:
> Subject: Re: [DNA] R-U152 and R-L21 on the European Continent
>
> You way I see it is, if you use fast mutating markers you are going to
> get a younger age --- if you use slow mutating markers you are going to
> get an older age. If you use a mix of the two you are going to get an
> age in between ... I think you have to keep the fast mutating markers to
> get the "right" mix (whatever that is)...
> Al
>


This thread: