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Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2010-06 > 1275947877


From: "Brian Quinn" <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] I2b1a M284+ and Irish Exiles to Iberia
Date: Tue, 8 Jun 2010 07:57:57 +1000
References: <mailman.3010.1275937015.11644.genealogy-dna@rootsweb.com>
In-Reply-To: <mailman.3010.1275937015.11644.genealogy-dna@rootsweb.com>


>From what I remeber of the Peninsula campaign the troops were not allowed to
take their local wives home
imagine the cruelty of that...the camp followers and their kids remained in
Spain/Portugal


and in the Crusades hordes campaigned against the muslims and no doubt left
a trace


The Wild Geese is the phrase you are looking for
http://www.doyle.com.au/wild_geese.htm

the O'Neill in 17th cent went to Spain and later Puerto Rico see
http://www.freewebs.com/mileshispaniae/oneillsinthemilitary.htm

being from Ulster they had Magennis and no doubt Macartan with them



quinny


>
> Message: 10
> Date: Mon, 7 Jun 2010 12:56:48 -0600
> From: "Ken Nordtvedt" <>
> Subject: Re: [DNA] I2b1a M284+ and Irish Exiles to Iberia
> To: <>
> Message-ID: <016b01cb0673$30355b80$>
> Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed; charset="iso-8859-1";
> reply-type=original
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "grandcross" <>
>
>> During the Napoleonic era, Wellington commanded an Anglo-Portuguese army
>> of
>> around 52,000. Half were Portuguese, about one quarter English and the
>> remainder Irish, Scots and German. Not all of them returned to the Isles.
>> It's not easy to discern how many came, went back or stayed behind,
>> however.
>> The same is true for General Moore, a Scotsman, and his disastrous
>> Iberian
>> campaign of 1809.
>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Moore_%28British_Army_officer%29
>
> Amusingly we are full circle in less than 24 hours. What brought my
> attention to the Irish regiments in Iberia was watching the PBS Sunday
> night
> series "Sharpe" about a soldier in the British army during the Napoleanic
> wars and Wellington's campaign in Iberia. Last night Sharpe had to deal
> with an Irish regiment, its snooty commander and commander's beautiful
> wife.
> The British were of course allied with the Spanish in this situation
> against
> the French. The Irish units were ambivalent, to say the least, about
> fighting for the English, but Sharpe whipped them into shape. Some did
> desert. But the way the program talked about the Irish hinted they were
> basing things loosely on a deeper generally accepted historical Irish
> connection to Iberia.
>
> But digging a bit deeper, the service of Irish in Iberian military goes
> back
> much further than Napoleanic era. Many of the troops Spain garrisoned in
> the low countries when they ruled there were apparently Irish units. This
> forum has been through these kind of issues for a long time --- most often
> concerning Roman legion units of various ethnicities stationed in the
> Isles.
> But demographics is destiny --- this is largely about numbers and whether
> these groups make a dent on the gene pool? Apparently these Irish in
> Iberia
> stayed and many brought their Irish wives with them.
>
>
>
>
>
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> End of GENEALOGY-DNA Digest, Vol 5, Issue 521
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