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Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2011-08 > 1313086264


From: Mike W <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] The fate of R-L11 in Europe
Date: Thu, 11 Aug 2011 13:11:04 -0500
References: <N1-tJG-Pmk7nn@Safe-mail.net><CAKWx04Tf+=T_N+g0DbvhUZOrqR=o8wTjcRnYhY5nZBtoGV44Bg@mail.gmail.com><4E44128B.4060802@jarman.net>
In-Reply-To: <4E44128B.4060802@jarman.net>


John, I agree in that the ability of a group to migrate and expand rapidly
is another factor. The groups' ages, geographic spread and ability to
move/colonize are all part of the mix. The available technology, animal
usage, terrain and travel paths are considerations along that line of
inquiry.

Do you have any thoughts as to how U106 and P312 separated in distance
rapidly?

Mike

---------- Forwarded message From: John German:

Rather than a common origin point, isn't the seperation of U106 and P312
indicating a very rapid spread of R11?


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