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Archiver > GENIRE > 2003-03 > 1047253122


From: "ToniW" <>
Subject: Re: What is the meaning of the term "Scot-Irish"
Date: Sun, 9 Mar 2003 18:38:42 -0500
References: <3e6b609c.98290359@ca.news.verio.net> <2wKaa.10721$wJ1.1023551@newsread2.prod.itd.earthlink.net> <92Laa.18306$EN3.149160@newsfep4-glfd.server.ntli.net> <EJLaa.10831$wJ1.1033397@newsread2.prod.itd.earthlink.net> <NMLaa.10838$wJ1.1034032@newsread2.prod.itd.earthlink.net> <JbMaa.18415$EN3.149805@newsfep4-glfd.server.ntli.net> <1TMaa.210201$Zr%.52673@news01.bloor.is.net.cable.rogers.com> <a4dn6vgomas50urs2224akdlmbjj9bk5g4@4ax.com>


"Bob, remove cap to reply" <> wrote in message
news:...
<follow-up snipped to post to only 5 groups!>
On Sun, 09 Mar 2003 "Is Mise Gan Ainm" <> wrote:
>Well, Just check the Concise Oxford English Dictionary
>[9th.Ed] to read:
>" Scotch, adj &n. adj,var. of Scottish or Scots. n. 1 var.
>of Scottish or Scots. 2. Scotch whisky. [contraction of
>Scottish]"
>So, it is an acceptable variation for Scottish people or
>Scottish whisky.

Hmm, if you ever meet my mother-in-law I suggest it would not be acceptable
to refer to her as "Scotch" within her earshot!
****snipped****

Nor within my Scottish mother's! Also, never call the tartan > plaid.
You will be shot at dawn, should you do use either in the wrong way.

Toni



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