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Archiver > GENIRE > 2003-03 > 1047312882


From: "Howard Beale" <>
Subject: Re: What is the meaning of the term "Scot-Irish"
Date: Mon, 10 Mar 2003 16:14:42 -0000
References: <3e6b609c.98290359@ca.news.verio.net> <lf0ba.283$i67.67845@newsfep1-win.server.ntli.net>


Sorted magAZine <> wrote in message
news:lf0ba.283$...
> On something of a tangent here, I was discussing the term Scots-Gallic
with a
> Scot and we had a disagreement about the pronunciation. In general in my
> experience, it's pronounced Scots Gahlic, similar to the word for the
French,
> in Ireland, while he said it's pronounced Gaylic in Scotland, the same as
the
> anglicisation of Gaeilge. My theory is that this shows two different terms
in
> the original languages, Scots Gallic in Ireland is derived from Gall, as
in
> outsider (meaning people who didn't live in Ireland), while in Scotland
it's
> derived from Gaidhlig, their own term for their language, and the two were
> anglacised with the same spelling. Further back, I'd guess that they all
> (Gael, Gall, Gaul, Gaidhil) have the same original Celtic root. Any
comments?

It's all Dutch to me


--
Howard Beale

"I'm as mad as hell and I'm not going to take it anymore"





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