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Archiver > GENIRE > 2003-03 > 1047321897


From: "Séimí mac Liam" <>
Subject: Re: What is the meaning of the term "Scot-Irish"
Date: 10 Mar 2003 18:44:57 GMT
References: <3e6b609c.98290359@ca.news.verio.net> <2wKaa.10721$wJ1.1023551@newsread2.prod.itd.earthlink.net> <92Laa.18306$EN3.149160@newsfep4-glfd.server.ntli.net> <EJLaa.10831$wJ1.1033397@newsread2.prod.itd.earthlink.net> <NMLaa.10838$wJ1.1034032@newsread2.prod.itd.earthlink.net> <JbMaa.18415$EN3.149805@newsfep4-glfd.server.ntli.net> <b4ignm$a5$1@newsg3.svr.pol.co.uk>


"jkm" <> wrote in
news:b4ignm$a5$1@newsg3.svr.pol.co.uk:

>
> "Elizabeth Lloyd" then "Shawna Reynolds" etc wrote:
>
>> > > > Scotch is a drink...Scots is correct NOT Scotch
>
>> > > That is the term that Genealogy.com uses. . .
>
>> Only in the USA. Never in Scotland!
>
> Never is an awfully long time! Back in the 18th century Boswell
> happily referred to himself and his countrymen as Scotch, and in
> 'History of the Highland Clearances', written in 1883, Alexander
> Mackenzie also referred to his people as Scotch. So the fashion,
> because that's all it is, for Scots to correct people who call them
> Scotch only grew up in the 20th century. Taken in the context of the
> times when they crossed the Atlantic it is perfectly proper for the
> Scotch-Irish to call themselves just that.
>
> It's not important anyway :-)
>
> Regards
> John
>
>
>
>

I heard the term used in the north of England in the 1960's but in a
different context. It was used to describe people descended from
marriages between Scots and Irish folk. Scotch-Irish as opposed to Irish-
English or Scotch-English. It was told me that there were many more of
the first than of the latter two categories.

--

Saint Sim mac Liam
Carriagemaker to the court of Queen Maeve
Prophet of The Great Tagger
Canonized December '99


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