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Archiver > GENIRE > 2003-03 > 1047328177


From: S Viemeister <>
Subject: Re: What is the meaning of the term "Scot-Irish"
Date: Mon, 10 Mar 2003 15:29:37 -0500
References: <3e6b609c.98290359@ca.news.verio.net> <lf0ba.283$i67.67845@newsfep1-win.server.ntli.net> <3E6C94C1.8060601@otenet.gr> <SB0ba.362$i67.71237@newsfep1-win.server.ntli.net> <lodp6v8t027ouepnb310582o3g17rr88sn@4ax.com> <fZ3ba.634$i67.137280@newsfep1-win.server.ntli.net> <m7jp6votqo7198vsq727dga8nnaj6oa8c7@4ax.com> <6i6ba.874$i67.229192@newsfep1-win.server.ntli.net>


Sorted magAZine wrote:
>
> As opposed to Gaelic? This is where I'm coming from, why are there two
> different words in English, Gaelic and (Scots-)Gallic?
>
I think you'll find that 'Gaelic' is the generally accepted English
spelling, rather than 'Gallic'. I've seen it written as 'Gallic' by people
who have heard it pronounced that way. Using that spelling can be
confusing, though, as 'Gallic' more often refers to things French.


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